Author: talinspring

Day trip to Waiheke Island, Auckland NZ

A 45mn ferry ride paradise from Auckland,NZ

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Citinerary: Chef John Wipfli, The Minnesota Spoon

I had the pleasure of meeting Jon while he was in charge of a beautiful oyster platter at a local store’s holiday event last December. He was opening his oysters presented on a large crushed ice bed with such délicatesse and simplicity that Arthur (my husband) and I headed towards him right away. We spent the evening devouring his oysters and talking about oyster bars in France, including our favorite, Le Baron Rouge, in the 11th. For Citinerary, I took the opportunity to interview Jon at his home and find out more about his passion for food. Image to the courtesy of Colleen How did you start doing what you do? After high school I went to art school in Wisconsin and I also had a cooking job. I quickly realized that I was better at cooking and I could make a living. I have been working in restaurants or around food for thirteen years now. After going to the French Culinary Institute in NY, I worked at Marlow and Sons and Cookshop. I came back …

Ciné Club: Timbuktu (2015)

Seen at the Walker Art Center last winter as a part of an Abderrahmane Sissako retrospective,  we were mesmerized by this cinematographically stunning film about a group of Islamic fundamentalists taking control of the town of Timbuktu… to watch as soon as possible, on a large screen if available… Here is an article written by the Walker Art Center about Sissako: “I think for me, cinema, or to make movies, or any act of creation is the research of yourself.” —Abderrahmane Sissako In his first stop on a US tour, Oscar-nominated director Abderrahmane Sissako comes to the Walker to present this short retrospective. His films are distinguished not only by great formal beauty and poetic imagery but also by humor, profound sympathy with human suffering, and an almost philosophical inquiry into relations between West Africa and the rest of the world. Although officially labelled a Mauritanian director, Sissako made films in Russia, Tunisia, Angola, and Mali before returning to his mother’s homeland to shoot the masterful Waiting for Happiness(Mauritania, 2002). Since then, his work on films such as Bamako …

Citinerary: A Not Very French Bastille Day

Unlike previous years, this summer I am staying in Minneapolis and the city is just a delight in this season. Minneapolis residents seem to spend every moment possible outside in the summer and there are celebrations and block parties just about every weekend – all of which make the city an extremely vibrant place to be in. And with my friend, Carole, visiting from Paris and my parents coming in August – it’s a little bit of France coming to me instead. Staying here meant that, for the first time, I would be able to check out the Minneapolis Bastille Day celebrations. As you can imagine, Bastille Day is a big deal in Paris, with dances (bals de pompiers) starting on July 13 in the various fire stations of the city, followed by the grandiose fireworks on the night of the 14th. Being in Minneapolis, the Barbette Bastille Day Block Party in the Uptown neighbourhood is the place to be, so Carole and I decided to go and check it out. The flyer looked rather …

Ciné Club: Ran (1985)

To introduce this movie, here is an excerpt from an interview by Peter Grilli from a wonderful book on Kurosawa: Perspectives on Kurosawa edited by James Goodwin. “Kurosawa Directs a Cinematic Lear” KUROSAWA: What has always troubled me about King Lear is that Shakespeare gives his characters no past. We are plunged directly into the agonies of their present dilemmas without knowing how they came to this point. How did Lear acquire the power that, as an old man, he abuses with such disastrous effects? Without knowing his past, I have never really understood the ferocity of his daughters’ response to Lear’s feeble attempts to shed his royal power. In Ran I have tried to give Lear a history. I try to make clear that his power must rest upon a lifetime of bloodthirsty savagery. Forced to confront the consequences of his misdeeds, he is driven mad. But only by confronting his evil head-on can he transcend it and begin to struggle toward virtue. I started out to make a film about Motonari Mori, the 16th century warlord …